Jeff McConnell

 

avatar for Jeff McConnell


 

 

9:00 AM
– 12:30 PM

Becoming Agile in an Imperfect World: Ahmed Sidky, Greg Smith
Taking a big bang approach to Agile is not a viable option for most organizations. Most successful adoptions of Agile are tailored to the strengths and limitations of the organization. This workshop will show you how to design a tailored roadmap to becoming Agile, despite the constraints around you. The roadmap includes 3 phases; Getting Ready, Piloting and Spreading Agile. If you’re just starting your agile transition or in a transition stage, this workshop will equip you with practical techniques and strategies to move from your existing process without starting from scratch.

9:00 AM
– 9:30 AM

The Origins of Agile: Robert Martin
What is Agile Development, and how did it come about? How was software done before agile, and why did we change? In this talk we will trace the recent history of software processes starting with the grand misinterpretation that led to Waterfall and culminating with the revolution that led to the Agile Manifesto. We'll talk about what software development was like before Agile, and what makes Agile so different.

9:00 AM
– 12:30 PM

Fluency over Proficiency: Accelerating Agile Learning and 'Hunting Fluency': Willem Larsen
While we value proficient knowledge of Agile practices, we value more the fluent, skillful expression of these practices and principles in daily use. Experience team and individual learning in this interactive session, via a toolkit of accelerated learning and teaching techniques. Used together, these techniques comprise a coaching and peer-to-peer mentoring language that drives ever-tighter cycles of improvement. Come to this experiential workshop for immersion in accelerated learning using the Language Hunting fluency game system.

9:00 AM
– 12:30 PM

Collaborating with Non-Collaborators: Pollyanna Pixton

We understand the vital importance of collaboration among team members. However, how can we deal with non-collaborators—people who won’t work with us? Although we may not be able to change them, we may be able to work with them. This session describes how to identify non-collaborator and examine the system within which the non-collaborators work: their success factors, motivations and measurements. Using a Trust and Ownership Model, we considers tools and techniques to cope with each trait. Deal with non-collaborators by building a strategy that empowers you to collaborate no matter what.

9:00 AM
– 12:30 PM

The Product Partnership: Using Structured Conversations to Deliver Value: Mary Gorman, Ellen Gottesdiener
A shared understanding of product needs is the basis for continual value delivery -- and requires a partnership of product stakeholders. In this tutorial attendees experience a technique that enables partners to collaboratively analyze needs and make just-in-time decisions on what to deliver next. The technique engages partners in structured conversions using seven question-sets to explore, evaluate, and decide on high-value options for the next cycle delivery. Attendees gain insights on how to use this technique to guide product need conversations at any level of agile product planning.

9:30 AM
– 10:30 AM

Agile In a Nutshell: Jonathan Rasmusson

If you’ve been doing Waterfall delivery most of your career agile can be down right scary: changing requirements, adaptive planning, iterative development. These are all intimidating things for managers and organizations used to doing things in discrete phases one stage at a time. In this introductory talk, we will look at agile in simple terms explaining: - what agile is - what working on an agile project is like - some of it's myths - which agile method is right for you, and - three steps you can take to becoming more agile today.

11:00 AM
– 12:30 PM

Introduction to Agile Planning and Project Management: Mike Cottmeyer
Agile introduces a number of tools and techniques designed to help the team figure out how much software we can build for the time we have, and the amount of money our customer is willing to spend. This talk will introduce the fundamental concepts necessary to break down and estimate our product backlog, how to organize delivery of that backlog for early risk reduction and rapid customer feedback, and how to get stable throughput and predictability as you mature your agile practices. This talk is for those looking to understand how (and why) agile methods lead to better business outcomes.

1:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

A Transformation Path to Enterprise Agility: Change Levers, Leaders & Culture: Michael Spayd
Organizational transformation is a journey, not a destination. It requires discipline, patience & courage, leaders at every level, insight on culture, a stomach for change. It requires real teams & the will to endure for years. In a fishbowl style consultation, one organization (will you volunteer?) will provide a realistic context to explore models of leadership, team dynamics, culture & change: the framework for deep, ongoing enterprise transformation. Meanwhile, participants organized into table teams will craft their own transformation plan, using a template & feedback from colleagues.

1:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

The Budgeting Black Hole: Predicting the Unpredictable: Johanna Rothman, William Rowden
An organization cannot run well without a budget. But a budget doesn’t have to be a frustrating futile exercise in prediction. Incremental budgeting, specific management actions, along with project portfolio management provides everyone the data they need. We will explore incremental budgeting in the context of a project, where we will periodically deliver value to the organization. We will see which work actually delivers value and can help predict budgets, and which work does not deliver value that helps with budgets.

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

Agile engineering practices and tools: Lars Skaar

Extreme Programming put strong emphasis on engineering practices to support agile execution and have in practice influenced how many of those practices have evolved. Scrum assumes such engineering practices are being used, without dictating specifically which practices. In this session, we will dive into the most important agile engineering practices and the kind of tools that supports them. We will also discuss the evolution of such tools, including those from both the open source community and commercial vendors.

1:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

Coaching Success: Getting People to Take Responsibility & Demonstrate Ownership: Christopher Avery, Ashley Johnson
Examine, practice, and apply thinking tools and communication strategies adopted by coaches worldwide for teaching, coaching, and inspiring ownership behavior—the essence of personal agility. Come learn to apply and teach the Responsibility Process, to handle objections, and to know just what to do when another believes they're owning it and you believe they aren’t. Doing so inspires far greater ownership behavior. You add more value as your charges take ownership. They learn, correct, and improve more easily, directly, and quickly. It's the empirical process at the individual level.

1:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

Managers vs. Agile Teams: Who Makes the Decisions?: Meghann Drury, Ken Power
Agile teams face daily decisions in a dynamic environment. Participants in this workshop will learn key strategic & tactical decisions agile teams make, including how they draw on experience to drive decisions. This is an interactive session that reviews how decision quality is assessed, how decision quality metrics are implemented and how metrics can be improved on their teams. Participants will rate their own levels of decision quality around particular agile activities. Participants should have some experience working on agile teams,e.g. as scrum master, product owner, tester, developer.

1:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

The Agile Leadership Kata: Discovering the Practice of Leadership: Tom Perry
In software development, we use the term “practice” loosely compared to many other disciplines. It is as if by repeating the word “practice” we might somehow actually arrive at that professionalism that so many desire. How do you practice your skills as an agile team leader? What would that practice look like? In this tutorial, we will explore the techniques you can use to practice and hone your skills as a team leader. From individual exercises through collaborative games, we will explore how we can practice and improve our leadership skills.

1:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

Technical Debt: Assessment and Reduction: Israel Gat
Do you really govern the software development process in your IT organization or do its uncertainty and unpredictability leave you, your internal customers and your company's customers aghast? Will technical debt play havoc with deployment dates you committed to and keep your development and operations staff from responding quickly and effectively to customer requests? Do you know how much money is required to "pay back" your software's technical debt? Once you take this workshop you will know how to quantify technical debt, rein it in, and mitigate its unpleasant consequences.

1:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

Introduction to Behavior Driven Development: Elizabeth Keogh, Katherine Kirk
BDD helps development teams hold conversations about the behaviour of their system with non-technical stakeholders. BDD has changed from its early roots as a replacement to TDD and now encompasses Feature Injection, extending across the whole software lifecycle. In this tutorial we look at the original reasons for BDD, returning the focus to the language and conversations at its heart. We look at how BDD’s patterns can be applied at multiple scales, from the initial project vision all the way to the code, to deliberately discover and address ignorance in every aspect of software development.

3:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

Facilitation & Communication in Agile Teams: Michele Sliger
While traditional projects expect most communication to take the forms of email and manager-led meetings, agile projects expect teams to self-organize, collaborate and participate in decision-making. But what is self-organization? How does it work? This 90-minute tutorial will focus on what it means to self-organize, how it occurs and how to help it along, and the hurdles that must be cleared in the process. See how the proper use of facilitation in agile meetings can be a key driver in the development of high-performing self-organizing teams.

3:30 PM
– 4:30 PM

Dr W. Edwards Deming's famous Red Bead Experiment - For Software Teams: Karl Scotland
Participate in Dr W. Edwards Deming's famous Red Bead Experiment. This classic learning tool helps illustrate the impact that a system, and traditional management approaches, can have on individuals who work within an organisation. I will also relate this experiment to approaches to software development and the management of software development teams. The experiment introduces many of Deming's ideas about management, including his 14 Points for Management. It also introduces the Statistical Process Control Chart. After the experiment there will be a discussion of the issues addressed.
 

 

9:00 AM
– 10:30 AM

Why Care about Positive Emotions?: Barbara Fredrickson
Dr. Barbara Fredrickson and her colleagues have found that positive emotions literally change the way the human brain works, widening people's perspectives, and their outlooks on life. According to Fredrickson’s broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions, this shift in mindset drives people to discover and build new traits, skills, and resources, and over time become better versions of themselves. In this presentation, Dr. Fredrickson will describe the science that backs up these claims and and describe the nonconscious upward spiral processes that enable people to thrive with agility.

11:00 AM
– 12:00 PM

Agile won't work here... really?: candi rai, Marc-Elian Begin
In this session, the presenters will share their experiences implementing Agile in what many people believe to be incompatible environments. In the first half of this session, Candi Rai will discuss how they adopted Agile in their mainframe COBOL environments in order to save $500,000 in costs while simultaneously increasing customer satisfaction. In the second half of this session, Marc-Ellan Begin will discuss how the European Space Agency (ESA) is adopting Scrum with industrial contractors in a fixed-price contracts context, replacing their traditional waterfall processes.

11:00 AM
– 12:00 PM

Agile Requirements: To User Stories and Beyond!: Chris Sims
Can extensive written requirements be dispensed with in favor of lighter weight 'stories'? It sounds easier, but can it really be as good? We'll start this session by staging a showdown between traditional and agile requirements. Participants will form teams, create requirements documents, do development (no technical skill or computers needed), and evaluate the results. Next, participants will learn by doing, as we build a 3-part model for agile requirements: User Story, Conversation, and Acceptance Criteria. Participants will leave with a solid understanding, and practical skills.

11:00 AM
– 12:00 PM

Overcoming Self-organization Blocks: Andrea Provaglio

We know that self-organization is a critical aspect of every successful Agile project and we know that it takes trust, respect, openness and responsibility; so why many teams have a hard time to achieve it? Self-organization changes the manager/team dynamics and the teammate/teammate ones. Resistance may arise and the source is frequently rooted in mental habits, such as a latent blaming culture, confusing guidance and command, fear of taking responsibility or losing status, unconscious agendas. Attend this session to learn, through demos and exercises, how to deal with these kind of issues.

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

Exploring Enterprise Agile Transformation Strategies: Mike Cottmeyer, Dennis Stevens
The goal of any enterprise agile adoption strategy is NOT to adopt agile. Companies adopt agile to achieve better business outcomes. Large organizations have no time for dogma and one-size-fits-all thinking when it comes to introducing agile practices. These companies need pragmatic guidance for safely and incrementally introducing structure, principles, and ultimately practices that will result in greater long term, sustainable business results. This talk will introduce a framework for safely, pragmatically, and incrementally introducing agile to help you achieve your business goals.

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

Strategies for Agile Portfolio Management: Kenny Rubin
Traditional portfolio management frequently uses principles that are at odds with agile thinking. For example, believing that people should be 100% utilized might lead to us to start many simultaneous projects leading to high levels of team-member multitasking. Managing a portfolio according to these principles all but guarantees a continuous stream of impediments that interfere with team-level agility and sub-optimizes delivered value. In this session I discuss strategies for aligning portfolio management with agile development to ensure a better end-to-end flow of value.

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

Adaptive Leadership: Accelerating Organizational Agility: Jim Highsmith
Leading agile organizations requires Adaptive Leadership that begins with understanding business agility and how practices like continuous delivery and a mindset of sustainable agility combine to create highly responsive IT organizations. Adaptive Leadership is two dimensional: Being and Doing Agile. Adaptive leaders embrace specific principles and practices, such as "doing" four key performance levers: “Do Less,” “Speed-to-Value,” “Quality,” and “Engage”, and “Being” agile—"adaptive", "riders of paradox", "exploring", and "facilitating."

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

Managing dependencies to create value: Sonya Lowry, Lars Skaar

The normal dogma of agile execution is to avoid dependencies as they are perceived to disrupt flow and the ability to act with agility. But, why avoid a dependency that creates business value such as reusing customer information across products? Why add yet another framework which would increase the technical debt when there is one suitable already there? This workshop will provide and refine a framework and practices to identify and manage the dependencies that truly create value while avoiding those that don't. This will ensure a more constructive way of dealing with dependencies.

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

Everything I know about Leadership I learned from Russell Crowe: Perry Reid
While the boss is the person you HAVE to follow, a leader is the person you WANT to follow. But are leaders born or do they grown through the trials and tribulations of experience? Who are the people you choose to follow and what are their leadership traits? In this fun and interactive tutorial we will examine several familiar characters from popular films and discuss their effectiveness as leaders and how they use their own unique style to influence the people they lead. We will then discuss which styles are most effective when working with self-organizing, self-directing Agile teams.

1:40 PM
– 1:50 PM

Definition of Ready: Ken Power
Definition of Ready is a set of agreements that lets everyone know when something is ready to begin, e.g., when a user story is ready to be taken into a sprint, or when all necessary conditions are right for a team to start a sprint. Definition of Ready does not attempt to turn a user story into a specification, but instead creates an interesting social agreement between the various stakeholders involved in delivering a product or system.

2:00 PM
– 2:10 PM

10 Minutes to a Better Standup: David Bulkin, Barninder Khurana
OK, you know the standup is supposed to last 15 minutes, but yours' last 45 minutes or more. You wonder, how can we say anything useful in 15 minutes? In this 10 minute lighting session, which by the way is shorter than your standup, we will use a sample Team Board (I did say Team Board, not Task Board) to demonstrate how to hold an effective standup that will allow your team to quickly coordinate, and thus self manage their efforts. We will also learn more about the Almost Daily Sit Down, and learn how sit downs, can be the cure for your sick standups!

2:20 PM
– 2:30 PM

When User Stories Just Don't Fit in a Short Sprint: Brad Swanson
In a complex environment, it can be impossible to write user-valued, end-to-end user stories that fit in a short sprint. In this talk, we'll understand the potential waste of trying to make stories _too_ small. I'll explain ways for teams to keep the value and fast feedback of short sprints without sacrificing the goal of having end-to-end user stories. Hint: you may have to set aside some of your Scrum dogma.

3:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

Beyond Metrics: D. André Dhondt, Ravindar Gujral
NOTE: There is a size limit for 2MB for presentations, so tweet either @adhondt or @ravindar to get the full slide deck. Metrics should only be used to measure progress until a specific goal is reached, after which we no longer track it. Instead, we learn to focus on more holistic goals and intangible indicators that keep a team humming along smoothly. Team energy, communication patterns, slack and reflection are much more important to increasing productivity than any myopic set of metrics.

3:30 PM
– 3:40 PM

10 Minutes to Testable Specifications: David Bulkin, Bob Payne
Come to one of Agile 2011's fastest paced workshop and learn the basics of creating testable specifications that drive requirements clarity, engender collaboration, increase estimation accuracy, and cure many of the ills that plague agile projects today. We won't make you an expert, but our acceptance criteria for this session is that you will leave with an understanding of how testable specifications improve your requirements and how the approach varies from the Test Drive Development that developers do.

3:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

Release your team's intelligent energy through five powerful conversations: Declan Whelan, Bryan Beecham
With successful agile teams there is a vibrant team buzz present. Struggling teams often seem dispirited and anemic. As a Scrum Master, coach or manager, you'll learn the five key drivers of engagement: I fit, I'm clear, I'm supported, I'm valued, I'm inspired. You will work with others, focusing on these drivers, to build the five key conversations that will tap & release the latent intelligent energy of the people on your teams. You will also be able to apply the techniques in this session to your family or other group situations. Prepare to be energized and challenged!

3:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

Team Swarming--Why and How: George Dinwiddie
Agile teams are often asked to swarm over the work, applying as many people to each item of work as productively possible before starting the next. Sometimes this magically works, and bystanders confidently describe the team as "gelled." Other times it looks like a train wreck, with people getting in each other’s way and on each other’s nerves. In the middle we find a continuation of the status quo. What’re the advantages of swarming? How can we increase the odds of gaining those advantages? We’ll explore the answers from your experience and mine.

3:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

The Emperor's New Clothes - Meaningful Interactions in Stressful Situations: Portia Tung, Jenni Jepsen
See the Emperor in all his glory! Which role will you play? We all interact with different types of characters in our daily lives which may lead to stressful situations. Together, we will learn how to communicate more effectively with others, especially at times of stress, by transforming our behavior from incongruence to congruence. We will learn to recognise incongruence by role-playing the 5 Coping Stances based on the Satir Model, then learn how to begin transforming our behavior from one of incongruence to congruence by thinking about interactions in terms of Self, Other and Context.

3:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

MAKING THE ENTIRE ORGANIZATION AGILE : Stephen Denning

The failure of traditional management has led to the reinvention of management: the whole organization must be focused on creating a stream of additional value to customers through continuous innovation. The reinvention reflects an application of Agile thinking to the whole organization. The session shows how applying Agile thinking to the whole firm involves five fundamental shifts in terms of the firm's goal, the role of managers, the way work is coordinated, the shift from value to values and the shift in communications shift from command to conversation: http://bit.ly/bryJHX

3:30 PM
– 4:30 PM

Narrative Coaching: Scott Dunn
People problems - some we expect and have answers for, sometimes only ideas. Sometimes we just don’t know. The narrative approach helps you collaboratively identify and draw out the solutions people have inside themselves. Narrative is a social or personal problem solving approach that shifts power and truth to the person wanting help. It strengthens areas of success. It is not prescriptive. It does not assume the coach has all the answers and needs only to talk with the client enough to identify the problem and prescribe a solution.

3:50 PM
– 4:00 PM

Will Pair Programming Ruin Your Team?: Tim Ottinger
A lightning talk based on the article at : http://agileotter.blogspot.com/2011/01/pairing-competence-and-recognition.html

4:00 PM
– 4:10 PM

A Day in the Life of a Menlonian: Lisa Ho, Tracy Beeson
Menlo Innovations is a fully agile shop. Our team is located in one open space - no cubes or offices. Our company’s mission is to return the joy to inventing software. Everything about the space in which we work and the people we work with fosters collaboration and creativity. This talk will seek to answer the question “If we visited your team, what would we see that would blow us away?” We will simulate a day at Menlo by taking attendees through each hour of the day, showing them through photos and brief explanations what it is that makes Menlo such a unique environment to work in.

4:10 PM
– 4:20 PM

The Story of the Wall: Ken Power
Do agile teams really still use index cards, PostIt notes and walls for planning and managing projects? Yes, absolutely. Even in this age of sophisticated tool support it is hard to beat the raw power and efficiency of working with physical media and using walls to display information. Using photos, videos and music, this talk describes the experiences of several teams from the perspective of the walls in the room. From architecture, requirements, planning, and sizing, to tracking project progress, see how teams use paper, markers and walls to foster collaboration, innovation and teamwork.

4:20 PM
– 4:30 PM

Scaling and Failing - The Human Limits of Effective Software Development: Michael Feathers
In this lightning talk, Michael Feathers will make the argument that most Agile adoption problems are fundamentally scaling problems. He will then relate two case studies which point toward the sort of advantage we might gain if we thoroughly embrace the limits of scale rather than trying to finesse them away.

4:30 PM
– 4:40 PM

The Three Ingredients of a GREAT Product Owner: Bill Gaiennie
One of the most important components of successfully applying an Agile approach is ensuring that the right product owner is identified. This attempt to find the right business representative has proven to be challenging in most organizations because they are uncertain about what they should be looking for. This short session will review the 3 most important ingredients you should consider when seeking to fill the role of product owner.
 

 

9:00 AM
– 10:30 AM

How to Get Started with Agile When You Don't Know Where to Start: Jason Little
When transitioning to Agile, people often focus on how 'agile' you are instead of focusing on the reasons why you chose to 'go agile' in the first place. In this session we'll talk about a 3-step process to help you start or tune your adoption regardless if you're a 5 person or 5,000 person company. We'll talk about understanding the objectives for 'going agile', how to get educated about what that really means and how to create an execution strategy. Attendees will create a worksheet to help them identify possible paths for transitioning based on their unique organizational parameters.

9:00 AM
– 10:30 AM

Twelve Steps to Agility: Dan Mezick
**You're trying to do Agile & it isn't really taking.** You are running into problems at various levels, from naysayers on teams all the way up to C-level execs. At your company, everything is a “top priority” & frequent interruptions are the norm. Explaining “who does what when” is complicated, & there is no clear answer on how to simplify that story. Most meetings you attend are a waste of time in your view. You know Agile is part of the solution, but the results so far are NOT good. **You ask yourself: What steps can we can take now that are quick, cheap & effective?**

9:00 AM
– 10:30 AM

Creating an Environment by Making, Keeping, and Amending Agreements: Amr Elssamadisy
Software processes such as Scrum, XP, and Kanban are a set of practices that a team agrees to follow. Making, keeping, and changing agreements is crucial to the success of any agile process. A team’s agreements and their ability to make, keep, and renegotiate these agreements is fundamental to their success. However, many times, team members are not all clear on their agreements. They may not have the same understanding of the explicit agreements and are usually carrying around a set of implicit agreements that they expect their peers to execute.

9:00 AM
– 10:30 AM

Risk Management Game: Shared Accountability Through Collaborative Risk Analysis: Ken Clyne, Julie Chickering
As we scale, it is imperative that everyone remain involved. We must not fall back on old habits.   Risk management is often viewed as a vestige of plan-driven approaches but our agile flavor has proven valuable for helping teams make hard decisions collaboratively and proactively. We introduce our risk management game, a powerful, collaborative and fun exercise for better results through collaboration.  We demonstrate that release planning is more than just stuffing stories into iterations. You will take away hands-on knowledge of a technique useful up and down your agile enterprise.

11:00 AM
– 12:00 PM

Tell Me Why -- 'The Golden Circle' of Agile Transformation: Jean Tabaka
Simon Sinek’s "Golden Circle" resonates with Agile adoptions. Often, we start with “What” as the core for our plans. Or, we may try to start with “How”. “Why” can be conspicuous by its absence. I fell into this “What” trap when I was first guiding teams in Agile transformations. I hadn't first asked "Why" though I did embrace Lean principles for "How". I jumped to What the practices were: 5 steps of what to do, roadblocks to expect, and benefits to reap. In this tutorial, we'll create our own Agile "Golden Circles" of "Why How What" for successful transformations.

11:00 AM
– 12:00 PM

Zero to Agile in 3 to 5 years - It's a Marathon, not a Sprint: George Schlitz, Sean Buck
Transforming mid-to-large-sized organizations requires much more than an introduction of agile principles and practices to teams. Any agile introduction is the start of a cultural, structural, political, and personal transformation, and to be successful requires understanding, commitment to focus on all of these dimensions...and...time. Stories abound about large companies starting agile transformations and resulting in reversion to the old ways, or some other state of "hybrid" agility. This talk is about an effort to change a large company holistically.

11:00 AM
– 12:00 PM

The surprising science behind agile leadership: Jonathan Rasmusson

Not everyone is a fan of the self directed self organizing team. It flies in the face of traditional project management, and often conflicts with the traditional organization model. The benefits of self directed teams however are too big to ignore and now we have scientific proof as to why. In this new talk on agile leadership, I explain: - how and why agile leadership works, - the science behind why so many choose to work this way, and - the impact it’s going to have on you and your organization.

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

Experiments: how does team structure affect behavior?: Sami Honkonen, Arto Eskelinen
When several teams work within the same codebase they share a lot responsibilities. For example, all teams are equally responsible for keeping the build green. However, teams are also committed to sprint goals that are independent from each other. So what happens when the build breaks and the sprint is nearing its end? Let's experiment how structure affects behavior and try to find structures that enhance responsibility.

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

Functional Management - There IS a place for it in Agile: Brian Sobus
With the adoption of Agile, many groups wonder whether functional managers are required any more. Even with self-organizing teams, functional managers are still an integral part of Agile, and their role has transformed into more of a coach than ever. This talk explores what I have seen as a traditional software manager and my experiences in leading Agile teams as their functional manager. It delves into the nuances that I have found that are required of this new form of manager, and how this needed leadership meshes well with and elevates self-directed teams.

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

Geek Leadership in Deep Legacy: Michael Hill
The overwhelming majority of development is legacy work, and much of that is deep: 4 years or more. Geek leaders in legacy need reliable techniques for helping teammates develop skills and attitudes to tame the legacy Cthulhu. Here are five proven techniques geek leaders can use to slay the beast: __Tight-Focus Refactoring__, __Lottery Learning__, __Noob Spinning__, __Pressure Bottlenecking__, and __Blind Baby Stepping__. As a technical leader in a legacy setting, you get to charm your team toward agile practice. Here are some tricks to bring with you.

3:30 PM
– 4:30 PM

Undoing Performance Review Damage - Coaching towards Customer Purpose: Harold Shinsato, Chris Sims
The Performance Review survives almost intact in most organizations despite the ever increasing rate of adoption of agile and lean techniques. Unfortunately attempts at motivating and engaging employees from such a mindset is more likely to cause damage. Help your coaching clients to understand the pain of the Mass Production mindset with an experiential simulation. And then see within the simulation how coaching can help adjust the process to use intrinsic motivation through more deep understanding of customer purpose.

3:30 PM
– 4:30 PM

Building an Agile Culture in a Regulated Environment: Michael Meissner
Omnyx, a GE Healthcare venture, has implemented scrum ground up, intentionally shaping the organization, cadence, and office space and focusing strongly on culture, core values, and team building activities. Writing a new Quality System allowed bridging the traditional divide between agile and regulated environments. Using a continuous Alpha/Beta process, we effectively incorporated stakeholder feedback while still working on our initial product launch for 2+ years. We firmly believe that culture is the most underestimated aspect of agile and it needs to be #1 priority for any agile leader.

3:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

Simple Methods for Reliable User Involvement: Hugh Beyer
One of the difficult problems faced by an Agile team is that of getting reliable user input. Since Agile projects depend on minimal up-front planning and specification, user feedback is critical. But product owners are rarely users themselves and the actual end-users are often located elsewhere and may be highly diverse. This session introduces participants to Contextual Inquiry (CI), a proven field research method for understanding users and their needs. We introduce CI, show how it fits into Agile development, and give participants practice in gathering data and then writing user stories.
 

 

9:00 AM
– 10:30 AM

Silo Busting: Tom Perry
Organizational silos are the source of the most pernicious dysfunctions you can find within any company. These divisions serve to isolate people in the organization within hyper-specialized roles. Ostensibly, we do this in order to help people succeed. However, you can deliver a product successfully without compartmentalizing everyone and everything in an organization within an inch of its life. In this tutorial, we explore the causes of organizational silos, their impacts, and the strategies that you can employ to help mitigate their impact on your teams and within your organization.

11:00 AM
– 12:00 PM

Reverting to Form – How to Make Sure That Agile “Sticks”: Howard Deiner
Whether the adoption of Agile takes place in a grass-roots “bottom-up” approach or a mandated “top-down” manner, it takes a change in culture, and a willingness to “give it a chance” that is the biggest determinate in making Agile stick in an organization. In particular, it is the acceptance of using business value as a pivot point that can make an organization realize that Agile is their friend, so long as they are willing to avoid the pratfalls that can drive an organization back to where it started.

11:00 AM
– 12:00 PM

Agile Office Spaces - Enabling Collaboration and Agility: Richard Cheng
Your Agile team has the right processes, engineering practices, tools, people, and technology, but what about your office space? Sure, you have a prominently displayed Scrum board, but does your physical environment enhance your collective Agility? Drawing from experiences at Agile shops and government offices, and in collaboration with his wife (Conni Gutierrez Cheng, a professional interior designer specializing in collaborative office spaces), Richard Cheng will lead a workshop session to bring together experiences of the attendees to create a shared learned experience.

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

SHU-HA-RI Applied to Agile Leadership—Driving Your Agile Evolution: Bob Galen
Far too many agile instances either fail or are challenged because leadership team members don’t sufficiently understand the fundamentals of agility nor how to map them towards effective execution. In this presentation, we’ll explore a basic assessment model for determining Agile Leadership Maturity as a means of assessing and improving their understanding and your overall effectiveness. Not as a means of stereotyping leadership, but simply as a tool for understanding the leadership maturity landscape within your organization. Then we'll develop context-based strategies for improvement.

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

How to design stuff that matters fast: Eewei Chen
Too much time is wasted creating that big design upfront only to find that users don't like what you have built once it has been released. Today we are in danger of not only over designing, but also designing solutions to the wrong problems. See how I experiment with rapid design techniques to ensure design solutions for the **right business problems** are delivered to the **right target audiences** *rapidly* and *continuously*. Learn how to create design solutions fast as a team and work with a client to get products that really matter out into market early that will delight users.

3:30 PM
– 4:30 PM

The Only Agile Tools You'll Ever Need: Jeff Langr
Do you need a high-end agile project management tool to support your growing agile adoption? Or do you need a high-end tool because your adoption has strayed from agile values? Low-tech tools such as information radiators and index cards can provide great results, but how do you use them most effectively? What's the sweet spot for high-end tools, and how do you prevent them from sapping productivity? What tools are missing from the spectrum of software-based tools? Disclaimer: This is *not* a vendor pitch, and the speaker owns no stock in companies that produce index cards. :-)
 

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