malomo2000

 

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11:00 AM
– 12:00 PM

What We Have Learned So Far: what we got right & what we got wrong: Chet Hendrickson, Ron Jeffries
Many of the established ideas and practices of Agile had their first public exposure through Ron and Chet. They helped take Agile from an underground movement to the mainstream. In this talk, Ron and Chet will bring you up-to-date on their current thinking on how to best do software in the Agile style. They will explain why you should stop doing some of the things they recommended in the past and what to replace them with. They will take one more run at getting you to do some of the basics of success that many teams neglect.

11:00 AM
– 12:00 PM

Overcoming Self-organization Blocks: Andrea Provaglio

We know that self-organization is a critical aspect of every successful Agile project and we know that it takes trust, respect, openness and responsibility; so why many teams have a hard time to achieve it? Self-organization changes the manager/team dynamics and the teammate/teammate ones. Resistance may arise and the source is frequently rooted in mental habits, such as a latent blaming culture, confusing guidance and command, fear of taking responsibility or losing status, unconscious agendas. Attend this session to learn, through demos and exercises, how to deal with these kind of issues.

11:00 AM
– 12:00 PM

Negotiating Agile Contracts: Angela Druckman, Jimi Fosdick
Business managers and consultants alike are finding that their standard templates for corporate contracts do not support the Agile process. Instead, these groups must work together to find a new way to define roles and responsibilities within an Agile framework. This session will focus on practical considerations from both sides of the negotiation table—those paying for the work and those providing it—in developing these agreements. Session facilitators will help participants develop an Agile approach to writing contracts from requirements definition through project closure and auditing.

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

Exploring Enterprise Agile Transformation Strategies: Mike Cottmeyer, Dennis Stevens
The goal of any enterprise agile adoption strategy is NOT to adopt agile. Companies adopt agile to achieve better business outcomes. Large organizations have no time for dogma and one-size-fits-all thinking when it comes to introducing agile practices. These companies need pragmatic guidance for safely and incrementally introducing structure, principles, and ultimately practices that will result in greater long term, sustainable business results. This talk will introduce a framework for safely, pragmatically, and incrementally introducing agile to help you achieve your business goals.

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

Agile Coaching Self-Assessment -- Where do you Stand on the Competencies?: Lyssa Adkins, Michael Spayd
As an agile coach, where do you stand? Where have you "got it down"? What more do you need to develop so that you can be the coach your teams truly need? In this interactive workshop, thought-leaders in agile coaching Lyssa Adkins and Michael Spayd lead you through a self-assessment using an Agile Coaching Competency Model that covers both the *doing* and the *being* of agile coaching. You'll leave the session with a specific plan of action for improving your agile coaching and (likely) many insights about the nature and importance of agile coaching -- for yourself and for your teams.

1:30 PM
– 2:00 PM

Agile and Kanban In Coordination: Ryan Polk
A review of the results of running two teams side by side inside the same development organization one traditional Agile iterative development the other Kanban. Both teams are fully coordinated with each other in a simple and effective system that optimizes responsiveness without compromising quality. I will detail my experience taking a 30 person development team from a rudimentary agile implementation to a fully Agile organization running both Agile / Iterative and Lean / Kanban models of development side by side.

3:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

Resistance as a Resource: Dale Emery
When people resist change, change agents both new and experienced can become confused, stuck, and frustrated. Dale Emery describes how you can turn resistance into a resource. Whatever else it may be, resistance is information—information about the values and beliefs of the people you are asking to change, about the organization, about the changes you propose, and about yourself as an agent of change. In this session, you will learn and create ways to tap into that information to translate resistance into effective action to move forward with change.

5:30 PM
– 7:00 PM

Industry Analyst Panel Discussion

Agile Trends and Future Directions - Come join the leading industry analysts as they discuss the latest trends and emerging best practices around Agile software development. Learn how the most successful software organizations are utilizing Agile to drive business performance. Find out how the latest innovations in Agile practices continue to mature as development organizations deploy Agile further across the enterprise.

  • Dave West, Forrester Research
  • Michael Cote, RedMonk
  • Melinda Ballou, IDC
  • Michael Azoff, Ovum
  • Thomas Murphy, Gartner
 

 

9:00 AM
– 10:30 AM

Scaling Software Agility: Advanced Practices for Large Enterprise: Dean Leffingwell
Dean Leffingwell describes how rapidly advancing agile methods are being successfully applied to enterprise-class software development. He describes emerging practices including: lean requirements practices that scale to the full needs of the enterprise, intentionally-emergent enterprise architectures, a kanban system for re-architecting large-scale systems, achieving strategic alignment and product development flow with the Agile Release Train, and strategies for agile portfolio management and governance. see. www.scalingsoftwareagility.com for more information.

10:00 AM
– 10:30 AM

Taming the customer support queue: Karen Greaves
In Aug 2010 we reduced the size of our development team. We needed to handle customer support issues and new development with the 3 remaining teams. We had over 600 open defects and the list was growing daily. On top of that our first clients were going live. Clearly some radical change was needed. We implemented Kanban. The result? In Dec 2010 we had no open severity 1 issues. Our queue was down to 54 issues. SLAs are met in most cases, and our resolution rate exceeds our incoming rate. I’d like to share our story, and inspire you to tame your support queue too!

11:00 AM
– 12:00 PM

Zero to Agile in 3 to 5 years - It's a Marathon, not a Sprint: George Schlitz, Sean Buck
Transforming mid-to-large-sized organizations requires much more than an introduction of agile principles and practices to teams. Any agile introduction is the start of a cultural, structural, political, and personal transformation, and to be successful requires understanding, commitment to focus on all of these dimensions...and...time. Stories abound about large companies starting agile transformations and resulting in reversion to the old ways, or some other state of "hybrid" agility. This talk is about an effort to change a large company holistically.

11:00 AM
– 12:00 PM

The surprising science behind agile leadership: Jonathan Rasmusson

Not everyone is a fan of the self directed self organizing team. It flies in the face of traditional project management, and often conflicts with the traditional organization model. The benefits of self directed teams however are too big to ignore and now we have scientific proof as to why. In this new talk on agile leadership, I explain: - how and why agile leadership works, - the science behind why so many choose to work this way, and - the impact it’s going to have on you and your organization.

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

Apply systems thinking in large-scale Scrum transformation: Yi Lv
In large-scale Scrum transformation, organizations experience gridlock after the initial success. System thinking is one important thinking tool that will help you see the dynamic view of the system and get over the challenges. Through the workshop, you will learn to recognize common system archetypes, so that you understand why you are getting certain undesirable effects; as well as common strategies to leverage in the situation, so that you direct your effort on the right place.

1:30 PM
– 1:40 PM

Leading the Agile Release Train: Drew Jemilo
The Agile Release Train (ART) is a scaling model for enterprise Agile programs. How can the key event -- the Release Train Planning Meeting -- be kept on track? Enter: The Release Train Conductor, a strong leader with the tools to run a two day meeting of 100+ people to synchronize large-scale planning!

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

Routine Conflict Processing as a Cultural Norm: Jim McCarthy
Regardless of the Agile techniques you employ, one thing is for sure: lots and lots of conflict is being generated. Questions about the current best idea, authority distribution, identifying impediments, and impediment removal are just some of the sources of conflict and heat in Agile adoptions. Conflict can kill your best intentions for your teams and organizations. Protocols- "structured interactions"-- are a useful tool for processing mistakes, differences and conflict. Attend this session to learn how to develop enterprise-wide norms for routinely processing conflict.

1:30 PM
– 2:00 PM

The home ground of Automated Acceptance Testing: Mature use of FitNesse: Børge Haugset, Geir Kjetil Hanssen
The concept of automated acceptance testing (AAT) has had nearly a decade to mature. While it has their score of supporters, it has not been embraced as a silver bullet for software development. The problem is that knowledge of when and where to fruitfully apply such a tool and method is scarce. In this article we describe a project group where the developers by their own account successfully use FitNesse. By describing how they select the appropriate places to use FitNesse, and how they use it, other practitioners can apply this to their domain. This corresponds and adds to recent research.

3:30 PM
– 4:30 PM

Continuous Integration: The minimum viable product: Julian Simpson

What does it mean to 'do' Continuous Integration? It used to be enough to execute your unit tests in CI. But the bar is steadily raising for engineering practices. In the last decade we've seen tremendous improvements in acceptance testing. JavaScript is now a platform in it's own right. Cloud computing is now vital. There's growing interest in deployment to prod. So Continuous Integration is under more pressure than ever. As the bar slowly raises for engineering practices, we’ll present 2011's minimum viable feature set for Continuous Integration.

3:30 PM
– 4:30 PM

Lean Startup: How Development Looks Different When You're Changing the World: Abby Fichtner

How does development look different when you're creating things that no one has ever created before? Lean Startup is about creating from a BIG VISION, where we want to change the world & do something really significant. It combines Agile Development with _Customer_ Development so we can be disciplined about how we create our startups. Learning (rather than working software) becomes our most important measure of progress and agile practices are pushed to the next level. Come get a glimpse of the next level of agile and discover how development looks different when you're changing the world.

4:00 PM
– 4:30 PM

IEEE Best Paper - Lean as a Scrum Troubleshooter: Carsten Jakobsen, Tom Poppendieck
Systematic has relentlessly improved how it does Scrum during the past 5 years using the A3 problem solving tool from Lean. This approach is behind the learning and experience reported in the past 5 years. This talk will take a walk behind the scenes of years of successful experiences and show the management and mechanics driving this learning. The cumulative learning from major improvements are presented, including a small set of measures that for the past 3 years has proven to be very valuable in monitoring project progress while at the same time fostering a Lean mindset in the teams.

5:30 PM
– 6:30 PM

Agile Alliance Members Meeting

The annual Agile Alliance Member's Meeting will be held at the Agile2011 conference. Members are invited to meet, hear about, and discuss Alliance business with the Agile Alliance board of directors. Drinks and snacks will be served.

6:30 PM
– 9:30 PM

Sponsor Reception

Get your Agile2011 passport stamped at this year's Sponsor Reception. The sponsors have played a large role in making this year's conference a great success. So come out and visit their booths, find out the latest and greatest in agile development, collect stamps, enjoy appetizers and drink, and enter for your chance to win great prizes!

 

 

9:00 AM
– 10:30 AM

Handling Product Management Across the Enterprise: Alan Shalloway
The common model of a product owner works well for small to medium scale Agile adoption. However, for large scale Agile adoption one must expand the role to include a product manager that works with the business stakeholders while the product owner focuses on driving the teams. How proper product portfolio management that eases the handling of business dependencies by properly loading the backlogs of the teams involved is presented. The timeliness of this flow from business stakeholders to product managers to product owners to teams also demonstrates the need to keep backlogs to a minimum.

11:00 AM
– 11:30 AM

IEEE Best Paper - Decision Making in Agile Development: A Focus Group Study: Meghann Drury, Kieran Conboy and Ken Power
Abstract—This research defines decisions made across four periods of the sprint cycle based on input from a focus group conducted with 43 people on agile teams. Results indicate that Sprint Planning includes decisions about planning work for the subsequent sprint, Sprint Execution includes tactical implementation and development decisions, Sprint Review includes decisions about continuing future sprints based on customer product satisfaction, and Sprint Retrospective includes decisions for improving the sprint process. Six key decision making obstacles were also identified.

11:30 AM
– 12:00 PM

Agile Team Perceptions of Productivity Factors: Claudia Melo, Daniela S. Cruzes, Fabio Kon and Reidar Conradi
In this paper, we investigate agile team perceptions of factors impacting their productivity. We here conducted two case studies in the industry and analyzed data from two projects that we followed for six months. From the perspective of agile team members, the three most perceived factors impacting on their productivity were appropriate team composition and allocation, external dependencies, and staff turnover. Pair programming and collocation were the main agile practices impacting productivity. Finally, most team members did not share the same understanding of the concept of productivity.

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

The Culture of Agility: Pete Behrens

Agility as a process is well understood today in feedback generating iterations or as a flow. Agility as a structure is becoming better understood through cross-functional teams working collaboratively. However, Agility as a culture has very little exposure - yet culture impacts every attempt at agility. This session provides a language for organizational culture, its impact on agility, and examples where exposing culture has aided adoption. We explore cultures within single organizations, sub-cultures across boundaries within larger organizations, and cultures bridging a corporate merger.

3:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

Scaling Agile to the Enterprise with Lean: Carsten Jakobsen, Mary Poppendieck
Lean is a journey, and Systematic began that journey five years ago. It started with an executive imperative, was kicked off with extremely successful Scrum pilots, spread to other teams using CMMI principles, then percolated up through middle management as success became obvious. This was certainly not easy! This is a story of a real lean journey taken by a large organization - the triumphs, the pitfalls, the honest results, the expansion as the company grew, the continuing saga of improvement. It's a story of lean theory, the struggle to implement that theory in practice, and the path ahead.
 

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