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9:00 AM
– 12:30 PM

Enterprise Agile Visioning and Learning – from the Organization to the Person: Jean Tabaka, Julie Chickering
Truly Agile organizations require new ways of creating and sharing knowledge. In this session, Jean shares personal experiences and exercises in visioning & learning models. Each model targets a particular part of knowledge creation. For the organizational level, we look at PDCA coupled with Pascal Dennis's True North & Mother Strategies. For team learning, we work with ORID retrospectives. Finally, Peter Senge's personal visioning helps us dig into our own work within an Agile growth-oriented context. This regular cadence of visioning and learning truly sustains Enterprise Agile.

1:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

A Transformation Path to Enterprise Agility: Change Levers, Leaders & Culture: Michael Spayd
Organizational transformation is a journey, not a destination. It requires discipline, patience & courage, leaders at every level, insight on culture, a stomach for change. It requires real teams & the will to endure for years. In a fishbowl style consultation, one organization (will you volunteer?) will provide a realistic context to explore models of leadership, team dynamics, culture & change: the framework for deep, ongoing enterprise transformation. Meanwhile, participants organized into table teams will craft their own transformation plan, using a template & feedback from colleagues.

1:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

Managers vs. Agile Teams: Who Makes the Decisions?: Meghann Drury, Ken Power
Agile teams face daily decisions in a dynamic environment. Participants in this workshop will learn key strategic & tactical decisions agile teams make, including how they draw on experience to drive decisions. This is an interactive session that reviews how decision quality is assessed, how decision quality metrics are implemented and how metrics can be improved on their teams. Participants will rate their own levels of decision quality around particular agile activities. Participants should have some experience working on agile teams,e.g. as scrum master, product owner, tester, developer.

1:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

The Agile Leadership Kata: Discovering the Practice of Leadership: Tom Perry
In software development, we use the term “practice” loosely compared to many other disciplines. It is as if by repeating the word “practice” we might somehow actually arrive at that professionalism that so many desire. How do you practice your skills as an agile team leader? What would that practice look like? In this tutorial, we will explore the techniques you can use to practice and hone your skills as a team leader. From individual exercises through collaborative games, we will explore how we can practice and improve our leadership skills.

3:30 PM
– 4:30 PM

Dr W. Edwards Deming's famous Red Bead Experiment - For Software Teams: Karl Scotland
Participate in Dr W. Edwards Deming's famous Red Bead Experiment. This classic learning tool helps illustrate the impact that a system, and traditional management approaches, can have on individuals who work within an organisation. I will also relate this experiment to approaches to software development and the management of software development teams. The experiment introduces many of Deming's ideas about management, including his 14 Points for Management. It also introduces the Statistical Process Control Chart. After the experiment there will be a discussion of the issues addressed.

5:30 PM
– 7:00 PM

The Agile Manifesto 10th Anniversary Reunion The Big Park Bench

Be sure to attend this historic event where we reunite nearly all of the authors of the Agile Manifesto.  Meet the authors at the celebratory reunion on opening night, including a Q&A session where questions will be fielded from the audience.  Visit the Special Reunion Event  website.

7:00 PM
– 10:00 PM

Ice Breaker Reception

Join us for Agile2011's Opening night reception. The night will be filled with food, drink and fun! After chatting with new attendees and reconnecting with old friends, be sure to stop by the vendors to see what's new in the industry.

 

 

11:00 AM
– 12:00 PM

What We Have Learned So Far: what we got right & what we got wrong: Chet Hendrickson, Ron Jeffries
Many of the established ideas and practices of Agile had their first public exposure through Ron and Chet. They helped take Agile from an underground movement to the mainstream. In this talk, Ron and Chet will bring you up-to-date on their current thinking on how to best do software in the Agile style. They will explain why you should stop doing some of the things they recommended in the past and what to replace them with. They will take one more run at getting you to do some of the basics of success that many teams neglect.

11:00 AM
– 12:00 PM

Overcoming Self-organization Blocks: Andrea Provaglio

We know that self-organization is a critical aspect of every successful Agile project and we know that it takes trust, respect, openness and responsibility; so why many teams have a hard time to achieve it? Self-organization changes the manager/team dynamics and the teammate/teammate ones. Resistance may arise and the source is frequently rooted in mental habits, such as a latent blaming culture, confusing guidance and command, fear of taking responsibility or losing status, unconscious agendas. Attend this session to learn, through demos and exercises, how to deal with these kind of issues.

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

Exploring Enterprise Agile Transformation Strategies: Mike Cottmeyer, Dennis Stevens
The goal of any enterprise agile adoption strategy is NOT to adopt agile. Companies adopt agile to achieve better business outcomes. Large organizations have no time for dogma and one-size-fits-all thinking when it comes to introducing agile practices. These companies need pragmatic guidance for safely and incrementally introducing structure, principles, and ultimately practices that will result in greater long term, sustainable business results. This talk will introduce a framework for safely, pragmatically, and incrementally introducing agile to help you achieve your business goals.

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

Putting the Fun Back In Your Retrospectives: Ken Clyne, Eric Willeke
Retrospectives are a key mechanism of a continuously improving process. However it is a challenge to implement them well. Many are poorly facilitated and just downright dull. It doesn't have to be this way. Retrospectives can be a time for celebration, a time for fun and a time for team-building. In this tutorial attendees will experience some of the techniques Rally coaches use to put the fun back in the retrospective including: Goldilocks and the Three Bears, The Break-Up Letter, Draw Me a Picture, Captions, Futurespectives, 5 Whys and Holding a Movie Conversation.

3:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

Beyond Metrics: D. André Dhondt, Ravindar Gujral
NOTE: There is a size limit for 2MB for presentations, so tweet either @adhondt or @ravindar to get the full slide deck. Metrics should only be used to measure progress until a specific goal is reached, after which we no longer track it. Instead, we learn to focus on more holistic goals and intangible indicators that keep a team humming along smoothly. Team energy, communication patterns, slack and reflection are much more important to increasing productivity than any myopic set of metrics.

3:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

Refactor Your Wetware: Andrew Hunt
You are used to working with software and hardware, but what about working with wetware—your own brain? Do you know the best ways to learn, or to think about solving problems? In this one workshop we’ll journey through bits of cognitive science, neuroscience, learning and behavioral theory. You’ll see surprising aspects of how brains work and see how to beat the system, improving your own learning and thinking skills.
 

 

9:00 AM
– 10:30 AM

The empirical process - at the very core of Agile: Daniel Brolund
Agile is all about empirical processes, controlled by feedback loops. But what does it mean? Most agile practices and principles are rooted in control theory. Knowing these concepts will improve the skills of any coach or mentor. In this “popular science”-session, software development will be described as a (simplified) mathematical process. It will teach how feedback, sensors, noise and delays affect outcome, error, robustness and other properties of our process. Both people with 10+ years of agile experience and absolute beginners are likely to get something out of this session.

9:00 AM
– 10:30 AM

Scaling Software Agility: Advanced Practices for Large Enterprise: Dean Leffingwell
Dean Leffingwell describes how rapidly advancing agile methods are being successfully applied to enterprise-class software development. He describes emerging practices including: lean requirements practices that scale to the full needs of the enterprise, intentionally-emergent enterprise architectures, a kanban system for re-architecting large-scale systems, achieving strategic alignment and product development flow with the Agile Release Train, and strategies for agile portfolio management and governance. see. www.scalingsoftwareagility.com for more information.

9:00 AM
– 10:30 AM

Seeing and Steering Systems: Three Pragmatic Tools: Esther Derby
When managers get out of the day to day work and focus on leading and improving the organization, they need a different set of tools. These tools aren’t new; but, they haven’t been widely taught in management training programs. These tools help leaders at all levels move beyond "telling & selling," and provide a way to influence patterns of behavior, understand causes and effects, and generate options for action.. In this session, I’ll cover three pragmatic tools: Eoyang CDE, Expand the Problem Horizon, and Finding Factors.

9:00 AM
– 10:30 AM

Agile Isn't Enough: Jeremy Lightsmith
Agile isn't the destination, it isn't even everything you need to get there, at best it's a set of ideas that will help you find what you need along the way. At this session, we'll explore other sources for some of the things you'll need. We'll look at a sampling of techniques, tools, and ideas from outside of agile that are extremely useful to agile teams : * Current Reality Tree - from Theory of Constraints * Paper Prototyping - from IxD * A/B Testing - from Lean Startup * What's the next action? - from GTD

11:00 AM
– 12:00 PM

There is No Spoon: When Agile Becomes One with the World of Work: Derek Neighbors
When we look at the Agile Manifesto we talk about people, interactions, collaboration and responding to change. However, we fail by only relating it to software and customers. It is time we started to embrace entire organizations being agile. Even then it requires entire communities, systems and society to collaborate towards a common purpose. When we move in that direction there is no agile only evolution.

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

Bad-Assed Double-Loop Learning: From Judgmental to Good Judgement: Derek W. Wade
"We all know" Agile leaders foster self-organization, so why do many have little effect on their teams, or worse, actually harm their effectiveness? People act in ways that are rational to them, but differences in mental models can make people seem irrational. By uncovering your team’s mental models, you can help them achieve a common rationale. This leads to stronger, integrated teams. ScrumMasters, Coaches, Managers, & Team Members will participate in robust scenarios based on team simulation in aviation and healthcare. You will leave experience directly applicable in your workplace.

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

The Joy of Work: Managing Performance, Innovation & Organizational Maturity: Sanjiv Augustine, arlen bankston
Do you find your work exciting and fulfilling? Is your team rewarded for finding better ways to work? While many organizations have adopted Agile approaches at a project level, few have effectively aligned their HR processes with Agile values, or made finding better ways of working a truly rewarding and exciting proposition for their teams. Join us to explore the subject of creating a truly holistic performance management system that not only adheres to Agile principles, but actively promotes individual drive, team innovation and organizational maturity.

3:30 PM
– 4:30 PM

Building an Agile Culture in a Regulated Environment: Michael Meissner
Omnyx, a GE Healthcare venture, has implemented scrum ground up, intentionally shaping the organization, cadence, and office space and focusing strongly on culture, core values, and team building activities. Writing a new Quality System allowed bridging the traditional divide between agile and regulated environments. Using a continuous Alpha/Beta process, we effectively incorporated stakeholder feedback while still working on our initial product launch for 2+ years. We firmly believe that culture is the most underestimated aspect of agile and it needs to be #1 priority for any agile leader.

3:30 PM
– 4:30 PM

Team Traps: Esther Derby
Some teams soar; others wallow, bicker and slog their way to uncertain results. Teams that soar have a few things in common: they have a shared goal, interdependent work, complimentary skills, mutual accountability. Slogging teams have a few things in common, too. They fall into predictable traps. What are those traps and how can you help your team climb out of them? That’s what Esther is here to talk about.
 

 

9:00 AM
– 10:30 AM

Agile Decisions: Paul Dolman-Darrall
Making the right choices is crucial. Decisions have generally been viewed as the prerogative of individuals - usually senior executive. The process employed, the information used, the logic relied on, have been left up to them, in something of a black box. Information goes in, decisions come out - and who knows what happens in between. Unlike other business processes, decision making has been rarely the focus of systemic thinking and analysis. This has left a significant opportunity to improve decision making as we would any other process through visibility, feedback and value.

11:00 AM
– 12:00 PM

Lean Procrastination - How to Identify the Last Responsible Moment: Marc Bless, Olaf Lewitz
Procrastination is the psychological behavior to needlessly and counter-productively defer tasks. Lean thinking recommends deferring decisions to the last responsible moment and delivering just-in-time. One is a burden, the other a management theory, yet both are concerned with deferring. Meet the Shu-Ha-Ri model of Lean Procrastination which gets you rid of management if applied to work you fully enjoy and master. Play with us the new LRM complexity game to explore how complexity effects and changes the last responsible moment and how Lean Procrastination enhances flexibility.

11:00 AM
– 11:30 AM

IEEE Best Paper - Decision Making in Agile Development: A Focus Group Study: Meghann Drury, Kieran Conboy and Ken Power
Abstract—This research defines decisions made across four periods of the sprint cycle based on input from a focus group conducted with 43 people on agile teams. Results indicate that Sprint Planning includes decisions about planning work for the subsequent sprint, Sprint Execution includes tactical implementation and development decisions, Sprint Review includes decisions about continuing future sprints based on customer product satisfaction, and Sprint Retrospective includes decisions for improving the sprint process. Six key decision making obstacles were also identified.

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

SHU-HA-RI Applied to Agile Leadership—Driving Your Agile Evolution: Bob Galen
Far too many agile instances either fail or are challenged because leadership team members don’t sufficiently understand the fundamentals of agility nor how to map them towards effective execution. In this presentation, we’ll explore a basic assessment model for determining Agile Leadership Maturity as a means of assessing and improving their understanding and your overall effectiveness. Not as a means of stereotyping leadership, but simply as a tool for understanding the leadership maturity landscape within your organization. Then we'll develop context-based strategies for improvement.

1:30 PM
– 3:00 PM

The Culture of Agility: Pete Behrens

Agility as a process is well understood today in feedback generating iterations or as a flow. Agility as a structure is becoming better understood through cross-functional teams working collaboratively. However, Agility as a culture has very little exposure - yet culture impacts every attempt at agility. This session provides a language for organizational culture, its impact on agility, and examples where exposing culture has aided adoption. We explore cultures within single organizations, sub-cultures across boundaries within larger organizations, and cultures bridging a corporate merger.

 

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